About Mohs Surgery2018-05-31T13:58:42+00:00

Dr. Storey is a Board Certified, Mohs Fellowship-Trained, Dermatologist

mohs-surgeryAbout Mohs surgery

Mohs surgery is universally recognized as a precise method for treating skin cancers of the face and other cosmetically sensitive areas because it can eliminate all the cancer cells while causing minimal damage to the surrounding normal skin.

Mohs surgery is also ideal for the removal of recurrent skin cancers ­tumors that reappear after previous treatment and can plague a patient repeatedly.

While skin cancers are usually visible to the patient, individual cancer cells are microscopic, and any cells left behind can cause the tumor to reappear. The tumor may spread beyond its obvious external margins, with “nests” of cells growing in unpredictable areas. With the Mohs technique, all tumor nests can be identified and removed with a high degree of accuracy, so that high cure rates are possible even when the tumor is recurrent.

A Mohs fellowship-trained dermatologist is best trained to determine when this technique should be used rather than other procedures.

The cure rate with Mohs Surgery is

approximately 95%, offering the best available treatment of skin cancer.

 WARNING

The following photos are graphic images of Mohs surgery & reconstruction.

Why Fellowship Training Matters

Mohs surgery has set a new standard for the treatment of skin cancer. An increasing number of physicians are performing Mohs surgery, but not all Mohs surgeons receive the same level of training as Dr. Storey, who is fellowship trained, Mohs surgeon.

Intensive Training
The American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS) was founded by Dr. Frederic Mohs. ACMS-approved fellowship training programs are significantly more rigorous than other Mohs programs.

Dr. Storey participated in one of the first accredited Procedural Dermatology (Mohs Surgery and Cosmetic Dermatology) programs in the nation. This program is so rigorous that it only accepts one Fellow per year. Dr. Storey trained under Abel Torres, M.D. former president of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Extensive Experience
Fellowship training programs are comprehensive and rigorous because skin cancer itself occurs in a diversity of forms, degrees, and areas of the body.

To complete an ACMS-approved fellowship, a physician must:

  • Participate in a minimum of 500 Mohs surgery cases
  • Learn to accurately interpret slides of tissue samples
  • Perform a wide breadth of reconstructions